Insurance News Round Up For This Week

  Insurance News Round Up… Here are the stories we cover in this week’s insurance news round up! Health insurance navigators targeted by new HHS rule In order to address one of the many concerns that states have concerning some of the health insurance provisions of the law, the Department of Health and Human Services has issued a new rule concerning the use of health insurance “navigators.” Navigators are meant to help consumers find the best coverage available to them through state or federally run insurance exchanges. The new rule…

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Iowa lawmakers claim that the state’s high risk insurance pool is a colossal failure

Iowa legislators met in the Senate on Monday to discuss the state’s federally-funded high risk insurance pool. Lawmakers were given copies of an editorial from the Des Moines Register during the meeting which outlined the program’s failure to enroll HIV-positive residents. The meeting quickly grew heated as lawmakers questioned members of the state’s Insurance Division over the matter. The insurance pool’s executive director, Cecil Bykerk, was also in attendance at the meeting and was subjected to questioning as well. Senator Matt McCoy, D-Des Moines, had strong criticism for the insurance…

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High-risk health insurance pool in Colorado asks federal government for almost $15 million more in funding

After experiencing claims that have now totaled twice the average for the country, the struggling high-risk health insurance pool in Colorado has now asked the federal government for additional funding of almost $15 million more than originally anticipated. Colorado has already received $90 from a total pool of $5 billion in federal money for assistance in carrying out an element of the country’s healthcare reform which involved insuring high-risk uninsurable individuals. The funds were meant to hold out until the insurance regulations are fully in place in 2014, at which…

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Sporadic health insurance coverage could be just as bad as no coverage at all, according to new study

Having sporadic health insurance coverage may seem like a good idea for those that have trouble making ends meet, but the costs may be the same as not having any insurance coverage at all. A recent study from the Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research shows that diabetic patients with sporadic insurance coverage were very likely to skip preventative care and examinations. According to the study, these patients skipped out on tests just as frequently as people without any insurance coverage. In the end, a plan that was meant to…

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California insurance program a major success among those with pre-existing conditions

California may have been the last state to launch an interim health insurance program before the Affordable Care Act takes effect, but its program is now ranked the second most successful behind that of Pennsylvania’s. The program began several months after the health care reform law was passed. It was created to offer those with pre-existing medical conditions, such as cancer and diabetes, access to affordable health insurance policies. The state received an unexpectedly high federal grant to promote the program, which saw its enrollment skyrocket in recent months. When…

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Subsidized California health insurance program fails to meet enrollment goals

A subsidized program for health insurance in California that offers consumers an affordable form of protection when they have pre-existing medical conditions, has managed to break the 5,000 member level at its first birthday, but this was notably lower than the anticipated enrollment. The state had received $761 million from the federal government in order to operate the program until the 2014 start of the new healthcare insurance requirements for state-run insurance exchanges as a part of the Obama Administration’s healthcare overhaul. At the start of this subsidized insurance program,…

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Missouri residents in the highest risk group will have lower health insurance rates

Missouri officials have announced that they will be decreasing the rates for the high risk healthcare pool by 23 percent for both current and new participants in the program. In 2010, Missouri created a new health insurance pool for the highest risk group, but though it was anticipated that there would be about 3,000 people who joined the program, less than 600 have done so, as many claim that the premiums are simply too expensive. The reduction in the rates are being made possible by both federal funds and policyholder…

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Low enrollment in federal insurance program spurs a drop in premiums

Earlier this year, the federal government expanded the eligibility of a federal health insurance program to include those with preexisting conditions. The initiative was originally slated to take effect in 2014, along with the rest of the Affordable Care Act, but the Department of Health and Human Services enacted the new rules in an effort to ensure more people were receiving health insurance. The program, however, has been fraught with low enrollment, spurring the HHS to lower premiums by an average of 18% throughout the nation. The HHS hopes that…

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Analysts: Enrollment in states’ pre-existing conditions insurance plans incredibly low

The health care reform law of 2010 is well known for a number of provisions that have succumb to a seemingly endless tide of controversy. These provisions generally garner the majority of public attention, but it is one provision that has been in effect for over a year now that may point to some fundamental flaws in the federal law. The provision in question is one that originally drew in public acclaim, but has since faded into obscurity. According to the law, each state must have a Pre-Existing Condition Insurance…

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