More kids have health insurance now than before the pandemic

American Health insurance - Kids

Coverage levels rose throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, likely due to a congressional provision. The percentage of American children who didn’t have health insurance coverage decreased notably throughout the pandemic, likely due to a congressional provision that stopped states from dropping anyone with Medicaid throughout the worst of it. The uninsurance rate among children in 2021 was 5.4 percent compared with 5.7 percent in 2019. The year before the pandemic struck, the percentage of kids without health insurance coverage was 5.7 percent. That figure fell to 5.4 percent last year, already…

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7 percent of Illinois residents are without health insurance

Health insurance - Illinois Sign

New US census data shows that state uninsured rates climbed just slightly between 2020 and 2021. Last year in Illinois, 7 percent of residents were without health insurance coverage, according to recently released data from the US Census. This number represents about 875,000 people across the state who don’t have medical coverage. When compared to 2020, this represented a slight increase in the number of people who didn’t have health insurance. That year, the uninsured rate in the state was about 6.8 percent. That said, the margin of error this…

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Health care costs propelled skyward by labor, inflation, and insurance rates

Health care - stethoscope on folded bills

There are several factors all contributing to the rising cost associated with medical services and products. Consumer prices are rising across the country, but it hasn’t been specifically determined how much higher health care costs will be headed skyward and how quickly. Product and labor costs alike have been rapidly climbing throughout the United States. With consumer prices climbing as they are, health care expenses are expected to go with them, which will send insurance rates upward in 2023 as well. According to a presentation by the Kaiser Family Foundation,…

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HHS to invest over $49 million into health care for kids and parents

Health care - Investment - Piggy Bank

The funds will be in the form of 36 awarded grants to strengthen Medicaid and the Affordable Care Act. The US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has announced through its Centers for Medicare & Medical Services (CMS) that it is awarding grants worth a total of $49 million to organizations working to reduce the rate of uninsured Americans and to bring health care access to more kids and parents alike. This represents the largest outreach and enrollment effort from the HHS through Connecting Kids to Coverage. The investment…

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Governor Kemp’s Georgia health insurance changes get the federal nod

Georgia health insurance - White House

The state will become the first in the country to offer federally subsidized plans only through private brokers. The Georgia health insurance system will make the state the first one in the country to offer its residents fully subsidized plans exclusively through private brokers. This will occur as a result of a new plan under approval by the Trump administration. Another portion of this plan will offer Medicaid to certain adults in the lowest income bracket. This new Georgia health insurance rule will mean that able-bodied adults will have access…

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Employer sponsored health insurance costs are up 4 percent this year

Employer sponsored health insurance - health insurance costs

The Kaiser Family Foundation data also showed that they have risen by 55 percent in 10 years. Employer sponsored health insurance costs have been rising steadily for Americans, having increased by 4 percent to $21,342 this year, according to a recently published Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF) study. The annual KFF survey found that workers are paying almost $5,600 for their coverage this year. KFF’s annual survey determined that American workers are paying almost $5,600 int their employer sponsored health insurance for family coverage. In 2010, that figure had been closer…

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Reproductive health care coverage is shrinking due to widespread job losses

Reproductive health care - pregnant woman

The pandemic crisis job losses are especially hard on younger women and women of color. The immediate economic harm from the COVID-19 pandemic crisis is clearer to see than issues such as shrinking access to reproductive health care coverage. Young women and women of color are being hit hardest by job losses and therefore coverage loss. Health plans are linked to employment for approximately half of Americans. This means that any of those 160 million people who lose their jobs also risk losing their health plans and, therefore, their reproductive health…

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