UN Secretary General Guterres warns of insurance industry “race against time”

Insurance industry - climate change - time

A plea for action was made during the virtual Insurance Development forum closing remarks. In UN Secretary-General António Guterres’ closing remarks at the Insurance Development Forum held virtually earlier this week, he asserted that the insurance industry is in a “race against time” to make the adaptations necessary for adapting to the speed of climate change. As the climate continues to change rapidly, the risks are altering their shape, size, and frequency. According to Guterres, carbon neutrality worldwide must be achieved within the next thirty years, global finance needs to…

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How Insurance Can Encourage Farmers to Mitigate Climate Change Risks

How Insurance Can Encourage Farmers to Mitigate Climate Change Risks

The sweeping impacts of climate change impact farmers at significant rates. As a result, insurance companies take a hit as well. For example, when nearly 20 million acres of farmland flooded in the American West, it initiated $4 billion in payouts from a federal crop insurance program. Because of disasters like this, farmers are coming around on the importance of mitigating the impacts of climate change to protect their own livelihoods. Insurance companies can help farmers make beneficial sustainability choices by helping those in the agriculture industry understand their impact…

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How Climate Change Affects the Housing Market

How Climate Change Affects the Housing Market

One look at the housing market these days will tell you almost all you need to know about it. Prices are on the rise, interest rates are low, and although hundreds of thousands of people are looking for homes to buy, it’s a seller’s market and pickings are slim. There are plenty of factors that can contribute to this trend from natural economic swings to the COVID-19 pandemic rush to get out of the cities.  Something that many people don’t necessarily consider as a factor that impacts the housing market…

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Secondary catastrophic perils on the rise from climate change, says Swiss Re

Secondary catastrophic perils - tornado destruction

Global economic losses from disasters (natural and human-caused) last year reached $146 billion. Secondary catastrophic perils are rising in a measurable way as a result of climate change, said a recent Swiss Re Institute sigma. The sigma was titled “Natural catastrophes in times of economic accumulation and climate change”. Severe weather events were the primary driver of losses overall last year, as was the case in years prior. Last year, worldwide economic losses from disasters broke the $146 billion mark. This represented a fall from 2018’s $176 billion. The ten-year…

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How Climate Impacts Your Property Insurance Costs

climate change and property insurance costs

There are plenty of factors that can impact your property insurance costs, from your location and the size of the home to the contents, but one thing that homeowners may not be prepared for is how climate is now affecting their premiums. A recent report released shows Canada is warming up at twice the rate of the rest of the world; this has left insurance providers feeling uneasy. That uneasiness is most likely going to translate to a rise in premium rates. So how exactly does climate impact your property…

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Impact of climate change to make insurance prohibitively expensive, says Munich Re

Impact of Climate Change - Damage House

The largest reinsurance company in the world has cautioned that most people won’t afford coverage soon. For several years, insurance companies have been warning that the impact of climate change will be an expensive one. Munich Re, the largest reinsurance company in the world, is now warning that global warming will make insurance too expensive for most people. The reinsurer has already blamed climate change for $24 billion in California wildfire losses. Munich Re chief climatologist, Ernst Rauch, explained in a recent Guardian report that it won’t be long before…

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In as little as 6 years climate change could raise American birth defects

birth defects - pregnancy

The impact of rising global temperatures could soon become heartbreakingly evident to families. Climate change could start raising the rate of American birth defects as soon as 2025, according to a new study. The research was published by the Journal of the American Heart Association last week. The study showed the various ways in which longer and more intense heat events will affect pregnant women. The research found that pregnant women are exposed to longer heat and more intense heat events, it has a measurable impact on their unborn babies.…

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