Florida, Michigan, and California attempt to shrink auto insurance rates

Motorists in Florida, Michigan, and California are hopeful that the attempts being made by their states will be successful in lowering the rates that they pay for their auto insurance coverage. Both Florida and Michigan have no-fault-based auto insurance systems, and these two states have been vigilantly examining their programs throughout their current legislative sessions. Florida has especially been in the spotlight, as it attempts to tackle a car insurance fraud problem that is spiraling out of control. California insurance, on the other hand, is examining its own system based…

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Mercury Insurance unveils new product for commercial auto coverage alongside new point of sale system for agents

Mercury Insurance chosen the 2012 Virtual Insurance Marketplace event as the venue for the introduction of their new commercial auto product that is set to be released across the country in the states in which the insurer is currently writing. This new product uses cutting edge technology to simplify the process for agents to qualify, rate, and issue new business, in addition to building on the insurance company’s capabilities for online service. The commercial auto product provides policyholders with standard ISO coverage at rates that are competitive within the marketplace.…

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Discount initiative for car insurance moves onward to November ballot

When voters in California head to the ballot in November, they will also face the issue of a discount initiative for auto insurance, called the 2012 Automobile Insurance Discount Act, which was over 99 percent funded by the chairman of Mercury Insurance. The initial sponsorship for the proposal was from the American Agents Alliance, a trade group. This initiative would allow motorists who change their insurers to obtain a discount if they have already had insurance on their vehicles. The proposal had received nearly 505,000 signatures (a random sample of…

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Mercury’s controversial Prop 17 finds its way back to the Californian ballot

Mercury Insurance’s controversial Proposition 17 has been resurrected and made its way to California’s November ballot. The proposition received funding from George Joseph, the billionaire chairman of the insurance company. The money was enough to bring the proposition back to life after it had been struck down by voters in 2010. Now, voters will have another opportunity to weigh in on the proposition, but there may be no guarantee that their efforts will put an end to the insurer’s plans for good. The proposition aims to make changes to Proposition…

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Mercury Insurance to raise rates in California, agitating consumer advocates

Mercury Insurance is looking to raise rates on homeowners and renters insurance policies in California. The company has plans to raise rates by an average of 8.8% for some 300,000 consumers in the state. If state regulators approve the proposal, the company will be generating an additional $19 million per year in profits. Consumer Watchdog, a non-profit organization concerned with fairness for insurance consumers, claims that the proposal is unreasonable because the insurer is already awash with profit. According to Consumer Watchdog, the company paid less than 50 cents on…

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Consumer Watchdog chastises California’s Mercury Insurance for supposed illegal practices

Mercury is looking to raise its auto insurance rates by $89 million in California, a move that consumer advocates are calling “illegal.” Consumer Watchdog, a group concerned with making the California insurance industry more consumer friendly, claims that the insurer is looking to pass a new law that would allow it to raise rates for good drivers that have, simply, not driven for a period of time for any reason. Mercury Chairman George Joseph claims that the legislation the company is backing would save policyholders money, but Consumer Watchdog calls such…

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California auto insurance law is being challenged by Mercury General Corp

Mercury General Corp., one of California’s largest auto insurance providers, has taken a bold new step in confronting one of California’s most controversial auto insurance laws. Proposition 103, as it is known, was first passed in 1989, much to the chagrin of many insurance companies offering automobile policies. The law brought many changes to the industry, among which were new regulations regarding rates and limiting the power of insurers to deny claims. For the past decade, Mercury General has been campaigning to change the law. As California’s Legislative session nears…

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