New health insurance survey reveals an alarming rate of uninsured Americans

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Health Insurance in AmericaA new health insurance survey shows that more than 9 million adults lost their health insurance coverage due to job loss in 2010. The Commonwealth Fund 2010 Biennial Health Insurance Survey, which was released Wednesday, estimates that 57% of people in the country become uninsured because of the recession. It paints a grim picture for millions of families reporting who have been stricken by job loss.

The ailing economy had made it difficult to find work, particularly employment that offers benefits. Despite a recovering economic climate, families are still at risk should they suffer from serious illnesses.

According to the report, the unemployed have had difficulty finding affordable health insurance. Of the estimated 9 million working adults that had lost coverage last year, only 25% of them have been able to receive coverage from another source. Another 14% were able to receive coverage through COBRA, a government program that provides coverage for the unemployed.

“This survey tells a story,” says Karen Davis, president of the Commonwealth Fund, “of the millions of Americans who lost their jobs during the recession and had no place to turn for affordable coverage.”

There is hope, however, in the form of the Affordable Care Act, the health care reform legislation that was signed into law last year. The federal law mandates that states establish health insurance exchange programs by 2014. The exchanges act as a one-stop-shop for buyers and will offer policies that are affordable for individuals and families.

Some of the provisions of the Affordable Care Act, according to the authors of this survey, are bringing a great amount of relief to struggling families. The years ahead will prove whether the overall law will bring forth the benefits it has promised.

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