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Teams of employees in the industry find themselves in on-demand positions with hurricanes, storms, and wildfires.

Throughout this active season of hurricanes, heavy storms, wildfires and earthquakes, the insurance workforce has been maintaining a steady on-call status. Historic flooding, rainfall, winds and tremors have left billions upon billions of dollars in property damaged or annihilated.

Homes, businesses, vehicles, equipment and products have been destroyed by active extreme weather.

Hurricane Harvey, Hurricane Irma, the and the wildfires across the American west have left devastation behind, as Mexico experienced an earthquake more powerful than it has experience in a century. The insurance workforce becomes active well before home and business owners can even return to their properties in order to assess the damage. Call centers and insurance agents are inundated with calls requesting information and advice regarding how policyholders should proceed and to confirm certain points regarding their coverage.

Once a claim can be made and it is safe to travel to the property, insurance claims adjusters are dispatched to be able to inspect homes and businesses as soon as possible. Teams of people are involved in these processes in order to move through the claims process and ensure that policyholders receive their due payments so they can begin to return to their daily lives.

To help the insurance workforce to respond as quickly as possible, technology is commonly employed.

insurance workforce natural disaster wind damageThe recent hurricanes and wildfires have presented insurance companies with some of the largest opportunities to test various forms of technologies. These include everything from software to mobile devices and drones that can provide a view and recording of damage much more quickly and easily than a human adjuster. Tech has become a central component of insurance employees’ abilities to inspect, appraise and process residential and commercial claims.

Still even by preparing for catastrophes so an insurance workforce is available on-demand, and even by using cutting edge technology, the devastation recently seen in many parts of the country has the nation’s insurance industry stretched pretty thinly. Workers are doing their jobs around the clock to try to speed through claims and offer consumers service as quickly as possible. Recent events appear to be functioning as a test of what insurance companies can do even when they’re struck from multiple sides.

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